What’s Better for Senior Couples – Marriage or Cohabitation?

When someone finds a partner when they’re both in their senior years, the choice between marriage and cohabitation is a more complex one. Individual and religious preferences aside, these two options carry serious financial and tax implications that should be considered. Here’s some insight from a leading elder law attorney in New Jersey.

The reality is that there are benefits and drawbacks to either choice – many seniors refuse to get married because they don’t want to affect the cost of their healthcare, compromise their Medicaid planning, reduce their retirement benefits, raise their taxes or have to redo their entire estate plans. Similarly, some seniors still choose marriage to take advantage of the tax breaks it offers as well as the benefits and protections. It really comes down to the importance of knowing how these choices affect your individual position to see what works best for both people in the relationship.

What to Consider When Weighing Up Cohabitation and Marriage as a Senior:

Housing: 

When you are cohabiting, living together means developing an agreement about housing, the associated costs, and each person’s rights. One person may agree to sell their home or rent it and move into the other’s property, which will have tax implications. When only one person’s name is on the deed, cohabiting partners have fewer rights, including legal rights if the property is sold after the partner passes or if the relationship dissolves. Here, married couples have more protection but will still need to sort out the implications of selling a property or purchasing a new asset.

Estate Planning: 

Senior couples tend to have far more complex estate plans than newlyweds in their 20s, which may include adult children and grandkids, wills and trusts, properties, investment portfolios, insurance, and 401ks. If you choose to cohabit, then your estate plan may only need minor changes depending on whether or not you want to sell an asset or you want to name your partner as a beneficiary in your Will. If you choose to marry, your estate plan will need to be extensively redone to determine your spouse’s rights and benefits from your estate, and to determine the impact of their debt if they have any. This should be done by an experienced elder law attorney who can talk you through the different tax and financial implications of your options to ensure that the estate plan is properly developed to protect the assets and people involved.

Medicaid Planning: 

It’s a good idea for seniors to commit to Medicaid planning in their retirement – this is a customized strategy based on your assets to ensure that Medicaid care can be accessed and penalties avoided. This strategy will remain largely unchanged if you choose to cohabit (although you should talk to your elder law attorney about it when they work on your estate plan), but may need extensive revision if you choose to marry. This is because your new spouse and the assets you gain in the marriage will be evaluated when you or your spouse applies for Medicaid.

Whether you decide on marriage or cohabitation is a personal choice, but it is important to know exactly how these choices will impact your estate plan and financial situation, which is where your elder law attorney can help. They can rework your documents and even introduce useful cohabitation contracts that will ensure that both parties are properly protected, giving you peace of mind with either choice.

Find Out How Marriage or Cohabitation Affects Your Finances and Rights – Speak to an Elder Law Attorney in New Jersey

Frank R. Campisano is a highly experienced and compassionate elder law attorney with considerable knowledge of Medicaid issues. In addition to planning ahead financially for Medicaid eligibility, he is also able to assist with applications, appeals, and other Medicaid issues. If you or a family member needs assistance with their Medicaid planning or protecting their assets effectively, don’t hesitate to get help today.

In addition, he can also help you to prepare additional estate planning documents, such as your Last Will and Testament, Healthcare Proxy, Power of Attorney documents, and trusts.

For a free consultation and Medicaid assistance, please contact us today and speak to Frank R. Campisano or visit our website at http://www.scclegal.com/

Should You Have a Medicaid-Qualified Annuity for Your Spouse?

Medicaid planning

A Medicaid-qualified annuity is a useful tool for protecting your assets for a spouse when the other spouse is applying for Medicaid. As with all Medicaid planning, it’s best to consult with your elder law attorney in New Jersey to see if it’s right for you.

  • Excess Resources in the Medicaid Application Process

Your estate is made up of a range of assets, all of which will be considered in the Medicaid application process, which covers a lookback period of 5 years from the date of the application. This means that any Medicaid planning strategy has to begin well before any benefits are required.

In order to qualify for Medicaid, you’ll need to be below their threshold, so any assets over this threshold are excessive resources. Essentially, these need to be removed from the household for more than 5 years before you make a Medicaid application. A Medicaid-qualified annuity can do this.

  • What are the Benefits of a Medicaid-Qualified Annuity?

A Medicaid-qualified annuity is a good option for spouses where only one spouse requires Medicaid, as it can be used to provide income for them. Without this type of measure in place, a household’s excess resources would be used for nursing home or long-term care instead.

This annuity is a single premium immediate annuity, which means that you pay in a lump sum (your excess resources) in return for a stream of income in the form of monthly payments until the lump sum runs out.

  • What are the Requirements of a Medicaid-Qualified Annuity?

There are legal requirements that define whether or not an annuity product is Medicaid-qualified. This includes:

  • That it has to be an immediate annuity,
  • That it pays income in equal installments (usually monthly),
  • That it has no balloon payments at the end,
  • That the terms of the annuity do not extend beyond the receiving spouse’s 

life expectancy, and

  • That it is irrevocable and non-assignable.

This means that if the spouse receiving the income dies during the period before the annuity is fully paid out, any remaining money will be used to pay the other’s spouse’s Medicaid bills first before it will go to a beneficiary.

Is This the Right Medicaid Planning Option for You? Speak to an Elder Law Attorney in New Jersey

Frank R. Campisano is a highly experienced and compassionate elder law attorney with considerable knowledge of Medicaid issues. In addition to Medicaid planning, he is also able to assist with applications, appeals, and other Medicaid issues. If you or a family member needs assistance with their Medicaid planning or protecting their assets effectively, don’t hesitate to get help today.

In addition, you can also prepare additional estate planning documents, such as your Last Will and Testament, Health Care Proxy, Power of Attorney documents, and trusts.

For a free consultation with an NJ elder law specialist for Medicaid assistance, please contact us today, and speak to Frank R. Campisano or visit our website at http://www.scclegal.com/.

Am I Entitled to Part of My Biological Parent’s Estate?

It’s perfectly natural to wonder what your rights are to your deceased parent’s estate. Well, the reality is that there’s no straightforward answer – it changes from case to case. Here’s some insight into this emotional and complex issue from an estate planning attorney in New Jersey:

  • Did Your Parent Die Without a Last Will and Testament?

If your parent had a valid Last Will and Testament at the time of their death, then whatever is contained in that document is legally binding. This means that their assets pass to their heirs in accordance with the instructions contained in the Will, regardless of who is mentioned or who is not. In some cases, a Will can be contested and your estate planning attorney will be able to determine whether or not you have a case.

However, when a person dies intestate (in other words without a valid Will) then it is a completely different story. In these cases, beneficiaries of the estate are determined by the courts in accordance with state law. These laws will not take into account anything other than a valid Last Will and Testament, so it doesn’t matter if a person has spoken about their wishes or not. This is why it’s incredibly important to have a professionally-drafted Last Will and Testament.

In these cases, beneficiaries are designated from immediate family outwards. For example, if a parent dies leaving a spouse and children of that spouse, the spouse inherits 25% (no less than $50,000 and no more than $200,000, plus ½ the remaining balance) and the rest is split equally amongst the children. If someone dies without a spouse but has children, the assets are split equally amongst the children.

  • Assets That Pass Without a Will

In some cases, assets can pass directly to a child without regard to the Last Will and Testament. This is often the case with property, where a child is named on the deed of the property. In this case, the property belongs to the person named on the deed and this cannot be affected by a Will, as you can’t grant assets you do not own legally. The same is true of the named beneficiary on an insurance policy or 401k.

Again, this makes it very important to have a professional-drafted Will, as having conflicting legal documents can lead to confusion and infighting in what is usually a very emotional time. An estate planning attorney will not only ensure that everything is perfectly clear in your own estate plan, but will also assist you with understanding and representing you in a claim against a poorly-drafted Will.

Understand Your Rights – Speak to an Estate Planning Attorney in New Jersey

At Sedita, Campisano and Campisano in New Jersey, estate planning attorney Frank Campisano is ready to assist you with all your estate planning needs, whether you need to draft a business succession plan, a personal estate plan, Last Will and Testament, Power of Attorney, a Living trust or to minimize inheritance tax on your estate. He can also assist in the event of Will disputes.

Contact us today and let us deliver expert estate planning advice to take care of all your wishes – whether your needs are big or small. For more information, please visit our website at http://www.scclegal.com/.

What is the Role of a Trust Protector

elder law trusts nj

A trust can fulfill many useful estate planning goals, from providing for your family and planning for your golden years to protecting your hard-earned assets from taxation. One of the roles that you might consider adding to your trust is a trust protector. Here’s some insight into this position, from an estate planning attorney in New Jersey.

  • What is a Trust Protector?

A trust protector is a person you appoint to watch over your trust in the long-term, specifically to ensure that the trust or the goals of the trust aren’t compromised or negatively affected by changes to laws or the circumstances surrounding the trust. They are usually an independent third party who specializes in this field, for instance, your estate planning attorney.

  • What Do They Do?

The role of the trust protector is usually to oversee irrevocable living trusts, which are trusts where the grantor cannot simply make changes to the terms of the trust, as they are permanent. Of course, no one can see into the future and, if something should happen that affects the ability of the trust to fulfil its goal, the trust protector – and only the trust protector – can step in and take action.

This is a very important role in the event of something like a crash in the stock market. If investments are falling alarmingly, it can be viewed as an emergency situation. Beneficiaries and grantors can’t access these assets directly to protect them, but the trust protector can.

The extent to which a trust protector can act depends on the powers that the grantor of the trust bestows on them, so it differs from trust to trust and depends a lot on what you, the grantor, permits. Some trust protectors can remove and replace existing trustees, settle disputes between trustees and/or beneficiaries, alter trust provisions, approve or veto investment decisions, or approve or veto discretionary distributions. Essentially, they are there to provide objective and expert oversight. 

In addition, this role can be expanded to provide assistance to grantors and beneficiaries, as you can empower them to modify your trust according to your wishes as grantor without having to formally amend the trust documentation, they can modify the trust after your death to keep it in line with your original goals (for instance, adding a new grandchild as a beneficiary), and maintaining the legal protection and tax benefits that caused you to create the trust in the first place.

Advice on Trusts, Wills, Power of Attorney and More from Your Estate Planning Attorney in NJ

At Sedita, Campisano and Campisano in New Jersey, estate planning attorney Frank Campisano is ready to assist you with all your estate planning needs, whether you need to make a business succession plan, Last Will and Testament, Power of Attorney, Medical Directive, a Living trust or to minimize inheritance tax on your estate.

Contact us today and let us deliver expert estate planning advice to take care of all your wishes – whether your estate is big or small. For more information, please visit our website at http://www.scclegal.com/

5 Useful Features to Include in Your Asset Protection Trust

Elder Law

Asset protection trusts are very useful legal tools for planning your retirement while saving your assets from a nursing home or Medicaid spend-down, undue influence, and even scam artists. Here’s some advice for making these trusts as effective and rewarding as possible, from an elder law attorney in New Jersey. 

  • How Do Asset Protection Trusts Work?

A trust is formed between three parties:

  1. The grantor (the person who is putting assets into the trust), 
  2. The beneficiary (the person who will receive income and other benefits from the trust), and 
  3. The trustee (the person who will manage the trust). 

In an asset protection trust, the grantor and the beneficiary can be the same person, so you can continue earning benefits from your trust. The trustee should be your elder law attorney; as they are licensed, bonded, and insured for this position. And, they are independent. The trust can be revocable or irrevocable, and both options have pros and cons. Your elder law attorney can help you decide what would deliver the best protection for your assets.

  • Features to Consider
  1. The Right to Receive Income: 

Often, trusts are used to provide regular income as well as to protect assets from taxation or Medicaid. This allows you to have access to dividends and investment income while still keeping those assets protected. This income can then be reported as individual income, which is taxed at a lower rate than trust income. It also helps reduce capital gains taxes.

  1. Lifetime Distributions: 

A trust can be tailored to allow the trustee to distribute assets to beneficiaries within the trustee’s lifetime. This is a useful option that allows the assets of the trust to be utilized in the event of unforeseen emergency expenses or to increase income during retirement.

  1. Checks and Balances: 

Checks and balances are there to ensure that the lifetime distributions clause isn’t abused, and is an important safeguard in the event of multiple beneficiaries. It simply requires that other beneficiaries must agree to assets being withdrawn from the trust.

  1. The Right to Change Beneficiaries: 

This feature allows clients to make changes to beneficiaries even when their trust is irrevocable. This is especially useful in the event of a divorce or marriage.

  1. Add Successor Trustees: 

If you use an elder law attorney to act as the trustee, this can be handled by their firm. But, it’s always a good idea to add your own trustees for your peace of mind. This is the person who will take over as trustee if the original trustee can no longer hold this position.

Speak to a Leading Elder Law Attorney in NJ Today for Advice on Your Trust
If you would like assistance in understanding and creating an asset protection trust, speak to Frank R. Campisano today. Experienced in elder law, compassionate and committed to his clients, you’ll receive the highest quality legal expertise and guidance that will help you secure better care. In addition, you can also prepare additional estate planning documents, such as your Last Will and Testament, Health Care Proxy, Power of Attorney documents, and trusts. For more compassionate legal guidance and a free consultation with an elder law attorney in New Jersey, please contact us or visit our website at http://www.scclegal.com/

The Unintended Consequences of Dying Without a Will

Everyone knows it’s important to have a Last Will and Testament. But, that doesn’t stop many of us from putting it off. Unfortunately, with only 44% of Americans having a will, millions of Americans are at risk of dying intestate (a situation where you don’t get to decide who inherits your assets). Here are some insights into the consequences of dying with no valid Last Will and Testament, from a leading estate planning attorney in New Jersey.

  • You No Longer Have a Say in Your Own Property

Having a Last Will and Testament allows you to control who gets your assets after you die. You know your family’s needs better than anyone else, which means you have the best insight into how to support your family in the event of your death. You’ll also be able to decide where sentimental items or family heirlooms should go, and what charities should inherit from your estate.

When you die without a will, none of your wishes – even if you have made them very clear to your loved ones – will be carried out. Instead, the state will have total control over how your assets are divided up and who inherits. This follows a very standard process known as probate, where typically, the bulk of your estate will go to your wife and children. If you have no wife or kids, your assets will go to your parents. If your parents are no longer alive, your assets will go to siblings and other relatives in a similar sequence. If the state can’t find any of your relatives, they keep your assets, which is known as escheatment.

  • You Won’t Have a Say in Your Children’s Guardianship

For parents, this is one of the most important reasons to have a Last Will and Testament. In it, you can decide together who will have legal guardianship over your minor kids in the event of your death. If you don’t have a will, guardianship will be appointed by the court. While they will try to make the best decision they can, they simply don’t have the ability to know your wishes or your family as well as you do.

  • You Can’t Provide for Loved Ones Who aren’t Related by Blood or Marriage

You might want to donate part of your estate to a charity or school close to your heart. Or you may not believe in marriage but spend years with a loved one without signing a legal document. In the eyes of the court, only blood relatives and legal marriages really matter, which can mean that people and organizations close to your heart are left without support. This not only means that your wishes aren’t met, but it can also mean the start of emotional, expensive court battles that can even result in the break up of families.

Provide Security for Your Loved Ones – Speak to an Estate Planning Attorney in New Jersey

At Sedita, Campisano and Campisano in New Jersey, estate planning attorney Frank Campisano is ready to assist you with all your estate planning needs, whether you need to make a business succession plan, Last Will and Testament, Power of Attorney, a Living trust or to minimize inheritance tax on your estate.

Contact us today and let us deliver expert estate planning advice to take care of all your wishes, regardless of whether your estate is big or small. For more information, please visit our website at http://www.scclegal.com/

The Pros and Cons of Converting Life Insurance into a Long-Term Care Benefit

These days, it’s fairly common to see advertisements and articles encouraging seniors to sell their life insurance policies in order to free themselves up from expensive monthly payments, to get much-needed funds to supplement their retirement lifestyle and/or long-term care or to do both. It sounds like a win-win situation. But, is it really? Here’s some insight from a leading elder law attorney in New Jersey.

  • There are Significant Costs Involved

In the ads, the pros are very clear – you can get rid of a large monthly expense and receive a lump sum that you can use to meet your current needs. There are some cons to this arrangement, however: 

  1. First of all, it can be difficult to determine what a good price would be for your policy. So, it’s a challenge to know if you are being treated fairly by the company buying your policy.
  1. Secondly, there are usually commissions that have to be paid, which can amount to 30% of your lifetime settlement. This means that you’ll get quite a bit less in the bank than what you are being quoted by the buyer. You’ll also most likely be subject to paying income tax on the amount you receive, while your heirs wouldn’t have to pay income tax on the death benefit they’d receive if you kept your policy in place. 
  1. Finally, receiving this lump sum can significantly affect your Medicaid eligibility. This is because it will change the value of your assets that Medicaid and other public assistance programs look at when deciding if you qualify to receive assistance or not.
  • Know All Your Options – Speak to an Elder Law Attorney in NJ

For these reasons, it’s essential to speak to an elder law attorney if you are considering this option. They can evaluate your options and put a financial strategy and Medicaid planning strategy in place to ensure you get the maximum benefits you are entitled to.

If you would like to get the legal assistance you need to protect your assets and long-term wellbeing, speak to elder law attorney Frank R. Campisano today. Experienced in elder law and estate planning, he is compassionate and committed to his clients, ensuring that you’ll receive the highest quality legal expertise and guidance. 

In addition to sound elder law advice on preventing elder abuse, Medicaid assistance, and Medicaid planning, you can also prepare additional estate planning documents, such as a Last Will and Testament, Power of Attorney documents, health care proxy, and trusts. For a free consultation, please contact us today or visit the website at http://www.scclegal.com/ 

What to Do If You are a Victim of Identity Theft

Identity theft can be devastating, leading to everything from financial losses and ruined credit ratings to endless bureaucratic issues. And it’s more common than you think – in 2017 alone, reports found that 16.7 million Americans became victims of identity fraud. Even more concerning is that seniors are especially vulnerable to this type of fraud, with criminals taking around $36 billion from senior victims each year. Here’s some important information on what to do if you become a victim of identity theft, from your elder law attorney New Jersey.

Step One: Notify Your Financial Institution

Your bank needs to be notified of fraudulent transactions on your credit, debit card or bank accounts as soon as possible. This will help the bank put a stop to the transaction and even recover your lost funds. Keep a record of the banks that you notified, when you spoke to them and who you spoke to, and follow up with them until the issue is solved.

Your bank will also be able to close the account/issue new cards/transfer your account so that your money will be safe from further fraudulent activity.

Step Two: Notify Credit Reporting Bureaus

Place a fraud alert with credit reporting bureaus if you suspect your identity has been stolen or if a data breach has occurred at an organization where your financial or social security details are kept. This will make it more difficult for thieves to use your details to open accounts. These bureaus include Equifax, Experian and TransUnion. It is important to note that placing a fraud alert on your account is free and that it will last one year from activation, so mark your calendar.

Step Three: Notify Government Agencies

If your social security information has been stolen, notify the Social Security Administration by calling in as soon as you can. If your driver’s license has been stolen (even if you don’t drive), let the Department of Motor vehicles know.

Step Four: Make a Police Report

Although the police may not always have the resources to follow up on identity theft issues, it is important to file an official report with them as financial institutions will often request proof of a police report.

Preventing Identity Theft

Of course, it’s important to take a proactive role in protecting your or your senior loved one’s identity. Monitor your credit report once per year or freeze your credit records until you need to access them. Go through your banking and credit card statements each month and look for suspicious or reoccurring charges that you don’t recognize. Don’t leave documentation with sensitive information lying around the house – lock it in a desk or filing cabinet and shred it before disposing of it. And, of course, do not ever give out banking details or social security information over the phone, online or in person unless you have verified that you are dealing with an authorized representative of a specific organization that requires this information.

Need Legal Assistance for Elder Law Issues? Speak to a Compassionate Elder Law Attorney in New Jersey
Experienced in elder law, compassionate and committed to his clients, you’ll receive the highest quality legal expertise and guidance you need from Frank R. Campisano. In addition to Medicaid assistance and Medicaid planning, you can also prepare additional estate planning documents, such as your Last Will and Testament, Healthcare Proxy/Medical Directive, Power of Attorney documents and trusts. For more compassionate legal guidance and a free consultation, please contact us or visit our website at http://www.scclegal.com/

Business Owners Need More Than Just an Elder Lawyer to Do Estate Planning

Elder Law

As a small business owner or a family business owner, your company is your legacy – a means to provide for your family and valued employees, giving them financial security and a rewarding career. But the reality is that all that can quickly fall apart if you don’t have the right estate plan.

Is an Elder Law Attorney Enough?

There are many different specialties in law and elder law attorneys offer clients services with considerable practical value. They specifically deal with issues that are highly relevant to small business owners, including:

  • Creating a Last Will and Testament
  • Creating Power of Attorney and Healthcare Proxy documentation
  • Developing Medicaid asset protection strategies 
  • Handling long-term care insurance and planning
  • Creating trusts
  • Inheritance tax avoidance

They deliver expertise, counsel and representation around many important legal and financial issues that affect seniors and their loved ones – but the reality is that this isn’t enough when you own a small business or run a family business.

NJ Business Succession Planning Protects You, Your Legacy and Your Loved Ones

It’s always difficult to consider a time in which you’ll no longer be around – but it’s essential to do so if you want to continue to achieve the goals that you set out to do when you started your own business. 

Without strategic business succession planning, family-owned and small businesses face a high risk of failure once the owner retires or passes away, being vulnerable to issues such as confusion over who will take on what role, who should or will inherit control over the business, and even family infighting. 

With larger organizations, business succession planning is seen as a given – a way to ensure the smooth running and stability of a business whatever may occur – but small businesses often overlook these benefits because it’s an uncomfortable conversation. In fact, around 58% of small business owners have no succession plan at all.

And it’s not just about protecting the company you’ve built from the ground up – it’s about effectively dealing with tax issues and skills development, and developing a strategy of what to do when or if there is no family member or employee available to take on the role. And this isn’t just about your sons and daughters, but the generations that come after them too. It’s not about walking away from your company or stepping back in your role; it’s about ensuring you have the flexibility and peace of mind to define your role as you get older.

Who Do I Call? An Elder Lawyer for Businessmen

Elder lawyers who also specialize in business law will help you develop an estate plan and business succession plan that helps secure the future of your business and delivers the peace of mind you need to focus on growing and managing your company. You’ll receive the highest quality legal expertise and guidance you need from Frank R. Campisano. In addition to NJ business succession planning, you can also prepare additional estate planning documents, such as your Last Will and Testament, Healthcare Proxy/Medical Directive, Power of Attorney documents and trusts. For more compassionate legal guidance and a free consultation, please contact us or visit our website at http://www.scclegal.com/

What You Need to Know About Estate Planning After a Divorce

In the event of a divorce, it’s essential that you update your estate plan. When 2018 ended in a rush of divorces before the tax law changes that took place on 1st January, there are many divorced people who haven’t yet had the time to change their estate plan – or realized the importance of doing so. Here are some insights from your estate planning attorney in New Jersey.

  • Inform your estate planning attorney: Send a copy of your divorce agreement to your estate planning attorney for them to view. They need to know what obligations you have towards your former spouse as well as changes regarding any children and dependents.
  • Your Power of Attorney: If these documents name your former spouse as the person who will make financial decisions on your behalf if needed, then this clearly needs to be changed. A new Power of Attorney is best, naming a trusted advisor, relative or friend to take over this critical role.
  • Your Healthcare Proxy: Similarly, you may have to name a new healthcare proxy to make medical or healthcare decisions on your behalf if you are unable to do so yourself. This is not a document that is only required for seniors – a car accident, workplace accident or health emergency can happen to anyone at any time of their lives, so it’s very important that someone other than your ex-spouse is trusted to make these decisions.
  • Revise your Last Will and Testament: A new Last Will and Testament will need to be drawn up to remove provisions for your ex-spouse or to remove them as an executor of the will or any trustee positions. This will ensure that they are unable to access any of your assets or trust in the event of your death.
  • Think of creating a trust for your minor children: If you pass away, the assets and money you leave to your children will be left under the control of their guardian until they reach the age of 18. While many people are comfortable naming their ex-spouse as legal guardian for their minor children, they are less comfortable with letting their children’s inheritance also fall under their ex-spouse’s control. A trust is a practical way of alleviating this issue, allowing you to appoint someone of your choosing to act as trustee and guardian for their inheritance. It also allows you to set out provisions for how this inheritance can be spent, for example, if you want it to fund your children’s education or if you want it to be portioned out over several years.

Get Peace of Mind from Your Estate Planning Attorney in NJ

Frank R. Campisano is an experienced estate planning attorney with a long history of service and loyalty to his New Jersey clients. In addition to assisting you with creating, storing or updating your Last Will and Testament, he can assist you with 529 plans, college savings strategies, developing trusts, healthcare proxies, Power of Attorney documentation and much more. 

For a free consultation, please contact us today and speak to Frank R. Campisano or visit our website at http://www.scclegal.com/

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